1. 00:58 25th Sep 2014

    Notes: 4816

    Reblogged from quotelounge

    Tags: quotes

    You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world…but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices.
    — 

    John Green (via kushandwizdom)

    Good Vibes HERE

    (via quotelounge)

     
  2. 00:53

    Notes: 180882

    Reblogged from goddamnitjenny

    Tags: quotesrelationships

    If she only wants you, don’t worry about who wants her.
    — Unknown (via kvtes)

    (Source: gold-kushkloudz)

     
  3. Is it me? Is it like I have some sort of beacon that only dogs and men with severe emotional problems can hear?
    — Monica - Friends (via anyasquotes)
     
  4. I get that you’re scared. But you’re not going to have to feel like that again. Because I’m not going to die, And I’m not gonna cheat on you, and I’m not gonna go anywhere! ‘Cause, I think you’re my best shot at… I think with you… you make me better. You make me wanna BE better. You make me want to be good. And I think I can. With you. I think I can. So I’m not going anywhere, and you can stop hiding. And if you wanna be scared that’s okay just be scared with me.
    — Alex Karev - Grey’s Anatomy (via anyasquotes)

    (Source: princessofpain)

     
  5. 15:30 18th Sep 2014

    Notes: 1822

    Reblogged from fuckyeahwomenprotesting

    Tags: quotes

    After an intense three hours, the workshop on pornography I have been leading is winding down. The 40 women all work at a center that serves battered women and rape survivors. These are the women on the front lines, the ones who answer the 24-hour hotline and work one-on-one with victims. They counsel women who have just been raped, help women who have been beaten, and nurture children who have been abused. These women have heard and seen it all. No matter how brutal a story might be, they have experienced or heard one even more brutal; there is no way to one-up them on stories of men’s violence. But after three hours of information, analysis, and discussion of the commercial heterosexual pornography industry, many of these women are drained. Sadness hangs over the room.

    Near the end of the session, one woman who had been quiet starts to speak. Throughout the workshop she had held herself in tightly, her arms wrapped around herself. She talks for some time, and then apologizes for rambling. There is no need to apologize; she is articulating what many feel. She talks about her own life, about what she has learned in the session and about how it has made her feel, about her anger and sadness.

    Finally, she says: “This hurts. It just hurts so much.”

    Everyone is quiet as the words sink in. Slowly the conversation restarts, and the women talk more about how they feel, how they will use the information, what it will mean to their work and in their lives. The session ends, but her words hang in the air.

    It hurts.

    It hurts to know that no matter who you are as a woman you can be reduced to a thing to be penetrated, and that men will buy movies about that, and that in many of those movies your humiliation will be the central theme. It hurts to know that so much of the pornography that men are buying fuses sexual desire with cruelty.

    It hurts women, and men like it, and it hurts just to know that.

    Even these women, who have found ways to cope with the injuries from male violence in other places, struggle with that pornographic reality. It is one thing to deal with acts, even extremely violent acts. It is another to know the thoughts, ideas, and fantasies that lie behind those acts.

    People routinely assume that pornography is such a difficult and divisive issue because it’s about sex. In fact, this culture struggles unsuccessfully with pornography because it is about men’s cruelty to women, and the pleasure men sometimes take in that cruelty. And that is much more difficult for people — men and women — to face.

    …This doesn’t mean that all men take sexual pleasure in cruelty. It doesn’t mean that all women reject pornography. There is great individual variation in the human species, but there also are patterns in any society. And when those patterns tell us things about ourselves and the world in which we live that are difficult, we often want to look away.

    Mirrors can be dangerous, and pornography is a mirror.

    Pornography as a mirror shows us how men see women. Not all men, of course — but the ways in which many men who accept the conventional conception of masculinity see women. It is unsettling to look into that mirror.

    A story about that: I am out with two heterosexual women friends. Both are feminists in their 30s, and both are successful in their careers. Both are smart and strong, and both have had trouble finding male partners who aren’t scared by their intelligence and strength. We are talking about men and women, about relationships. As is often the case, I am told that I am too hard on men. The implication is that after so many years of working in the radical feminist critique of the sex industry and sexual violence, I have become jaded, too mired in the dark side of male sexuality. I contend that I am simply trying to be honest. We go back and forth, in a friendly discussion.

    Finally, I tell my friends that I can settle this with a description of one website. I say to them: “If you want me to, I will tell you about this site. I won’t tell you if you don’t want to hear this. But if you want me to continue, don’t blame me.” They look at each other; they hesitate. They ask me to explain.

    Some months before that someone had forwarded to me an email about a pornography site that the person thought I should take a look at — slutbus.com. It’s a website to sell videos of the slutbus. Here’s the slutbus concept:

    A few men who appear to be in their 20s drive around in a minivan with a video camera. They ask women if they want a ride. Once in the van, the women are asked if they would be willing to have sex on camera for money. The women do. When the sex is over, the women get out of the van and one of the men hands the women a wad of bills as payment. Just as she reaches for the money, the van drives off, leaving her on the side of the road looking foolish. There are trailers for 10 videos on the website. All appear to use the same “plot” structure.

    In the United States there are men who buy videos with that simple message: Women are for sex. Women can be bought for sex. But in the end, women are not even worth paying for sex. They don’t even deserve to be bought. They just deserve to be fucked, and left on the side of the road, with post-adolescent boys laughing as they drive away — while men at home watch, become erect, masturbate, obtain sexual pleasure, and ejaculate, and then turn off the DVD player and go about their lives. There are other companies that produce similar videos. There’s bangbus.com, which leaves women by the side of the road after sex in the bangbus. And on it goes.

    I look at my friends and tell them: “You realize what I just described is relatively tame. There are things far more brutal and humiliating than that, you know.”

    We sit quietly, until one of them says, “That wasn’t fair.”

    I know that it wasn’t fair. What I had told them was true, and they had asked me to tell them. But it wasn’t fair to push it. If I were them, if I were a woman, I wouldn’t want to know that. Life is difficult enough without knowing things like that, without having to face that one lives in a society in which no matter who you are — as an individual, as a person with hopes and dreams, with strengths and weaknesses — you are something to be fucked and laughed at and left on the side of the road by men. Because you are a woman.

    "I’m sorry," I said. "But you asked."

    In a society in which so many men are watching so much pornography, this is why we can’t bear to see it for what it is: Pornography forces women to face up to how men see them. And pornography forces men to face up to what we have become. The result is that no one wants to talk about what is in the mirror. Although few admit it, lots of people are afraid of pornography. The liberal/libertarian supporters who celebrate pornography are afraid to look honestly at what it says about our culture. The conservative opponents are afraid that pornography undermines their attempts to keep sex boxed into narrow categories.

    Feminist critics are afraid, too — but for different reasons. Feminists are afraid because of what they see in the mirror, because of what pornography tells us about the world in which we live. That fear is justified. It’s a sensible fear that leads many to want to change the culture.

    Pornography has become normalized, mainstreamed. The values that drive the slutbus also drive the larger culture. As a New York Times story put it, “Pornography isn’t just for dirty old men anymore.” Well, it never really was just for dirty men, or old men, or dirty old men. But now that fact is out in the open. That same story quotes a magazine writer, who also has written a pornography script: “People just take porn in stride these days. There’s nothing dangerous about sex anymore.” The editorial director of Playboy, who says that his company has “an emphasis on party,” tells potential advertisers: “We’re in the mainstream.”

    There never was anything dangerous about sex, of course. The danger isn’t in sex, but in a particular conception of sex in patriarchy. And the way sex is done in pornography is becoming more and more cruel and degrading, at the same time that pornography is becoming more normalized than ever. That’s the paradox.

    — 

    This essay is excerpted from Robert Jensen’s book, Getting Off: Pornography and the End of Masculinity, published by South End Press. (x)

    (Source: exgynocraticgrrl)

     
  6. 22:54 17th Sep 2014

    Notes: 98264

    Reblogged from lovequotesrus

    Tags: quotes

    'That’s all right,' she says, and I have to wonder how many times she’s said that to the people in her life who screwed her over somehow.
    — (via itsalongstory)

    (Source: scuanias)

     
  7. Was I banging my head against the wall… thinking I can get him to stop and notice me? Did I have to change my expectations?
    — Carrie Bradshaw (via whatwouldcarriesay)
     
  8. 18:14

    Notes: 4208

    Reblogged from stfurapeculture

    Tags: quotes

    You know what else it costs to write about and talk about consent? I’m going to be super real with y’all. It has cost me the vast majority of my relationships with men. Not all at once, but eventually, over time, one by one. It was one sexist joke too many, it was one boundary-crossing-creep-defender over the line. It was the constant microaggressions or the combination of being privileged and defensive about it and unable or unwilling to do any better. Most grew weary of arguing about feminist issues, or about the fact that I wouldn’t let them just win those arguments, even though they usually had no idea what they were talking about. They couldn’t deal with the fact that I won’t allow anyone to say disparaging shit to and about me and mine. Or they won’t or can’t do better after I explain how to do better many many times and finally I have to peace out on them for my own safety. I have at present a tiny handful of guy friends. One I get into arguments with nearly every time we talk. I fear that relationship may go the way of most of my past relationships with subtly sexist men—away, that is to say. Which is really too fucking bad. Because the truth is, I don’t hate men—I hate male privilege. I really like men, shit, I love them actually, some of them. I miss having men friends, but not enough to let the mild misogyny slide. I have got to take care of me and mine. That’s where we clash, because I refuse to just smooth things over, to just let things go. They’re accustomed to deference and I’ve taught myself to drop that habit as best I can.
     
  9. 15:30

    Notes: 21045

    Reblogged from fatnutritionist

    Tags: quotes

    I had a patient in the clinic who really did not want an abortion but who had no resources to cover the costs of prenatal care or childbirth. She was single and without insurance coverage but made just enough money to be ineligible for state assistance. She already had outstanding bills at the hospital and with the local ob-gyn practice. No doctor would see her without payment up front.

    We were willing to do the abortion for a reduced rate or for free if necessary. But she really didn’t want an abortion. Once I understood her situation, I went to the phone and called the local ‘crisis pregnancy center.’

    "Hello, this is Dr. Wicklund."

    Dead silence. I might as well have said I was Satan.

    "Hello?" I said again. "This is Dr. Wicklund."

    "Hello," very tentatively, followed by another long silence.

    "I need help with a patient," I said. She came to me for an abortion, but really doesn’t want one. What she really needs is someone to do her prenatal care and birth for free."

    "What do you expect us to do?"

    I let that hang for a minute.

    — 

    This Common Secret, Susan Wicklund

    Crisis Pregnancy Centers often disguise themselves as medical facilities, with advertisements offering “help” with an unplanned pregnancy. Their main goal is to keep the pregnant person from having an abortion at all costs. Usually, all they’ll give you is a free pregnancy test, some baby clothes, and maybe a box of diapers.

    The patient referred to in the quote was given free prenatal care and did not have to pay the financial cost of childbirth by a local anti-choice doctor. She would often stop by Dr. Wicklund’s office to let her know how she was doing:

    "He (the doctor) always moans and groans about being tricked into [doing this]," she says. "Then he goes off on these tirades against abortion."

    (via provoice)

    "This Common Secret" is such a phenomenal book. And yeah, crisis pregnancy centers are generally evil, so there’s that.

    (via thebicker)
     
  10. 17:27 14th Sep 2014

    Notes: 21172

    Reblogged from captbubbles

    Tags: quotes

    Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

    In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

    “The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

    In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

     
  11. 02:22

    Notes: 359775

    Reblogged from cryssymcfatfat

    Tags: quotes

    I hope you fall in love with someone who never lets you fall asleep thinking you’re unwanted.
    — 

    Unknown (via h0lycake)

    this is very important

    (via errrinvia)

    (Source: slugly)

     
  12. 02:19

    Notes: 17213

    Reblogged from psych-facts

    Tags: quotes

    You crave the deepest connections with others, but you don’t trust to let anyone in.
    — Unknown (via psych-facts)
     
  13. 02:19

    Notes: 13126

    Reblogged from lovequotesrus

    Tags: quotes

    Fantasies. Like having your own entertainment channel that you can cut, edit and replay anytime, anywhere.
     
  14. 01:17

    Notes: 111499

    Reblogged from disneydreamscometrue

    Tags: quotes

    Who gives a shit if you don’t finish college. Who gives a shit if you marry young. Who gives a shit if you say ‘fuck the world’ and go against everything your parents want. Do what makes YOU happy. And don’t you dare give a shit about what anybody else thinks.
    — (via mynameispride)

    (Source: cr-est)

     
  15. 15:30 7th Sep 2014

    Notes: 134340

    Reblogged from michaelfaudet

    Tags: typographyquotes

    image: Download

    langleav:

Love & Misadventure is available online via Amazon, BN.com + The Book Depository and Barnes & Noble, Kinokuniya, Books Actually, Fully Booked and other good book stores worldwide. 

    langleav:

    Love & Misadventure is available online via AmazonBN.com + The Book Depository and Barnes & Noble, Kinokuniya, Books Actually, Fully Booked and other good book stores worldwide.